Tuesday, June 9, 2009

How to Mold Chocolate using Chocolate Molds

We thought it would fitting to start with an introduction on how to mold chocolate.


Using chocolate molds to mold chocolate is a very simple process and can be a lot of fun too! Chocolate molds are available in a variety of shapes and themes and can be found at your local craft store or at various on-line stores. You will also need to use chocolate melting wafers such as Merckens chocolate wafers, which are very easy to use and do not require the tempering that real chocolate does. We will cover chocolate tempering in another article. For now, let's start with the basics.
Select your desired chocolate molds and make sure they are clean and dry. Dig out your bag of lollipop sticks if the chocolate molds you are using require them. Get a two cup glass measuring cup and fill to the top with the chocolate melting wafers. We have tried several brands of chocolate melting wafers and find that Merckens chocolate wafers are by far the best tasting wafers. You can find much cheaper chocolate wafers at your local craft store but, in our opinion, they are very waxy tasting. As the old saying goes, you get what you pay for. Put the glass measuring cup (containing chocolate) in the microwave for one minute. Take out and stir. Now microwave at 30 second intervals, stirring in between, until melted. Be sure not to overheat or chocolate will seize up, get a grainy texture and taste burnt.
Once chocolate is melted it can be poured either directly from measuring cup, spooned, or squirted from a squeeze bottle in order to fill the mold. It is better to slightly under fill the mold rather than over fill. Overfilling the mold will cause the chocolate to run up and over the sides and will create a lip around the edge of the chocolate piece.

Once the chocolate mold is full, tap down on counter to release any air bubbles that may be trapped inside. You will be able to see the air bubbles releasing. Tap the chocolate mold until they all appear to be released. Failure to follow this step will create what appear to be holes or pockets on the surface of the chocolate. At this point you can add the lollipop sticks if necessary.

Put the filled chocolate mold in freezer for 5-10 minutes or until the chocolate has hardened. The time spent in the freezer will vary based on the size of the chocolate mold cavities. You basically want to leave it in the freezer for as long as it takes to harden. Be careful not to leave it in too long or the chocolate may actually freeze. In addition, you don't want condensation to build up on the chocolate as this will create a sticky mess and a dull looking piece of chocolate.
Once the chocolate has hardened remove chocolate mold from the freezer and tip over on to a plate or cookie sheet. The chocolates should pop right out. If any are stuck in the chocolate mold then tap gently on the counter to release. If they really are stuck, re-assess whether the chocolate has actually hardened. You may need to put them back into the freezer for a few minutes. If you are working with a deep mold you may have to pry a little on the mold in order to release.

Let the chocolate pieces return to room temperature before putting in packaging.
For a more detailed piece of chocolate you can paint the details of the mold with different colors before pouring in the chocolate. Use of a regular paintbrush will be more than sufficient to get this job done. Let each color harden in the freezer after each application before using a different color. I would suggest mastering the basics before venturing on this path.

Chocolate molding can be a lot fun and I have yet to meet a person who doesn't like chocolate! Make your own gifts, party favors and much more with chocolate molds. Kids enjoy helping in the process as well. Just make sure you melt extra chocolate as it will miraculously disappear if there are kids involved!

For one of the largest selection of chocolate molds on the internet click here CHOCOLATE MOLDS


To purchase Merckens chocolate on-line on the internet click here MERCKENS CHOCOLATE


RETURN TO WWW.CUSTOMCHOCOLATESHOP.COM

16 comments:

  1. Why no mention on tempering the chocolate? THis is necessary for the beta crystals to form so it comes out of the mold easily with a shine and a snap.

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  2. We do mention tempering - but only enough to say that we will cover it in another article

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  3. Can u melt regular chocolate(in the bars or chips)?

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  4. no most would need to be tempered

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  5. I haven't found the tempering article. Has it been written yet? Also, does that top paragraph mean that Merckens is fake chocolate? I think I'd rather get Baker's or Ghirradeli's chocolate from Walmart.

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  6. I find working with the colored wafers very difficult. I was told to add oil. Is this true and how much should I add? Is there another secret to having success with the colored chocolate?

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  7. Hi I have never added oil so Im not sure that it would work without making the chocolate greasy. There are paramount crystals that I use that help thin it out a little (or a lot) depending on how much you use. You can purchase them here:

    http://www.customchocolateshop.com/pacr.html

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  8. As far as the coloring goes, you can but special oil based colors at local craft stores to color your white chocolate. The oil prevents the chocolate from clumping. If you use regualre food coloring you buy from the store, it will clump and harden fast becuase of the water base. Oil will help it. Just a few drops at a time but i find in annoying to do so bwecause you still have to microwave it often to be able to use it properly but I never found an issue with it making the chocolate taste different.

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  9. That correct - never use water based coloring to color your chocolate. Oil and water dont mix well. If you have a problem keeping the chocolate thin enough to use you can add some paramount crystals to the melted colored chocolate to get the desired level of thin-ness.

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  10. Can you add a liqueur? I am making chocolate covered strawberries and the recipe calls for the chocolate and shortening, heavy cream and liqueur?

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  11. Those ingredients sound more like a recipe to make a truffle center rather than to dip the strawberry in. The addition of heavy cream would not allow chocolate to harden around the strawberry. Liquer can definitely be added to a truffle center but if youre looking to flavor chocolate for actually dipping the strawberry in you may want to consider a chocolate flavoring product.

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  12. Stating that Merckens is a confectionary coating and not real choclate may clear up some confusion. It is an excellent coating, easier to work with and less expensive for the home candymaker, and does not need oil added for any reason. Paramount cystals are flakes of fat that will emulsify into the coating and are an excellent way to thin the coating so it drapes nicer. If your plastic mold is clean and dry when you filled it with melted coating and if you leave it in the cold freezer until the underside of the mold appears dull, it will release so shiny and perfectly formed that your customers will swear it is plastic! The formed candy will release with almost no effort. NEVER oil or grease a plastic mold as the fat will solidify and nothing will make it come out. Plastic molds last for many years when properly washed, dried and stored on edge. Candymaking is economical and allows a homemaker to create affordable treats using healthier ingredients and less preservatives than any commercial treat. In closing, water is the enemy, never add to melted coating. It will harden immediately and be unusable. It will not remelt. Have a great time making candy!

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  13. hi, Im from Uruguay, South America, and my english is very poor. I would like you to write all the information in spanish, if possible, because im really interested on this things!!
    Thank you very much, Patricia.

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  14. I was wondering why once a colored chocolate is melted poured into a mold and it comes out white? I tried to make orange pumpkins and they came oout white.
    Patti

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  15. Merckins is the best tasting choc to use. I have been making homemade candy for 35 yrs. I have created my own version of many different types of filing.

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